Mon, 01/27/2014 - 18:52

Think age is the leading cause of hearing loss? Think again. Noise is in fact the primary driver behind hearing loss and it is significantly impacting the younger generations. Tens of millions of Americans including approximately 12-15% of school-age children are estimated to have permanent, noise-induced hearing loss.*

When sound enters the ear, vibrations from the ear drum cause movements in tiny hair cells that stimulate the auditory nerve fibers that communicate with the brain. Loud noises can damage the delicate hair cells or other parts of this system, leading to hearing loss.

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Fri, 01/24/2014 - 11:38

If you suspect you may have a hearing loss but have never had your hearing tested, a recent BBC radio program called “Hack My Hearing” provides a great look into what it’s like to have hearing loss and what to expect during a visit to an < ahref=http://www.lyrichearing.com/hearing-aid-blog/what-audiologist>audiologist.

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Thu, 01/23/2014 - 15:01

Last month we featured Seattle Seahawks fullback Derrick Coleman and his unique perspective on having hearing loss. Not surprisingly, Derrick’s outlook on life has been an inspiration to many other people with hearing loss—including a little girl who sent him a letter, saying:

“Dear my inspiration Derrick Coleman, I know how you feel. I also have hearing aids. Just try your best….” She then went on to describe that she loves sports and also wears hearing aids.

Now Derrick has responded with his own note to thank his young fan and tell her, “Even though we wear hearing aids, we can still accomplish our goals and dreams!”

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Mon, 12/16/2013 - 17:44

WARRENVILLE, Ill., Dec. 13, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- During the Special Olympics Southern California Fall Games scheduled Dec. 13-15 in Irvine, athletes will receive a very special holiday gift…hearing. Phonak, the global leader in hearing instruments and the Hear the World Foundation have partnered with Special Olympics to help support the hearing needs among athletes.

The Healthy Hearing Screening Program – part of the broader Healthy Athletes initiative sponsored by Special Olympics – is a critical initiative aimed at providing needed hearing healthcare to this medically underserved population. Nearly 30 percent of Special Olympics athletes are found to have hearing loss, but many have not had viable access to hearing healthcare until now.
About Healthy Hearing

During key Special Olympic competitions around the country, athletes undergo an onsite hearing screening as part of the Healthy Hearing program. Nearly one in three Special Olympics athletes in the United States fail a hearing screening. From there, Special Olympics works with hearing healthcare professionals to provide further hearing testing. For those that need hearing solutions, Phonak and the Hear the World Foundation make sure that they receive hearing aids free of charge. Until now, many have never had their hearing tested or have been unable to afford hearing aids due to a lack of health insurance or access to care in general.

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Thu, 12/12/2013 - 13:44

Raising a deaf or hard of hearing child can bring unexpected challenges and gifts. Fortunately, help for hard of hearing children has come a long way in the last few decades. Today, more than 90% of all newborns are screened for hearing loss so that hard of hearing children can be identified earlier and can start receiving treatment to develop communication and language skills like children with normal hearing.

Just as hearing loss awareness has increased, so has public support for children with hearing loss. This holiday season, a mall in Virginia hosted a “Signing Santa Day”.* Children were able to share their Christmas wishes with Santa Claus, who was fluent in American Sign Language (watch parents and children enjoy the holiday cheer). A pizza parlor in Michigan will also host several similar events for hard of hearing children this year.

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Wed, 12/11/2013 - 14:17

“When somebody tells me I can’t do something, all I do is say, ‘Watch me.’

Derrick Coleman, running back for the Seattle Seahawks recently addressed deaf and hard of hearing children at a middle school in Tacoma Washington. Coleman is the first hard of hearing offensive player in the NFL and taught himself to read lips rather than learn sign language to adapt to his hearing loss.

In an article in the News Tribune, Coleman discusses the embarrassment and challenges he faced as a child with hearing loss. However, his parents encouraged him to overcome those challenges and told him “never to use his hearing loss as an excuse”. Now, Coleman uses hearing aids as well as lip-reading to communicate on and off the field. In fact, his ability to read lips has helped him anticipate plays like the tipped pass that helped him score his first touchdown on Monday Night Football.

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Mon, 12/09/2013 - 12:38

Body mass index (BMI) is a number calculated from a person’s height and weight. It is typically used to estimate body fat and also assess whether someone may be at risk for health problems based on the weight category he or she falls into. Such health problems might include hypertension, Type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. However, new research suggests that body mass index may also have a relationship with hearing loss.

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Thu, 12/05/2013 - 13:50

Many hearing aids on the market claim to be invisible. However, Lyric hearing aids are still the only hearing aid that is 100% invisible from any angle. Unlike other hearing aids, Lyric hearing aids do not have a receiver (that looks like an antenna) coming out of the device itself. Other so-called “invisible” hearing aids do.

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Thu, 12/05/2013 - 11:43

With football season in full swing, a New York Times article titled, Fighting “Hearing Loss From the Crowd’s Roar”, highlighted the hearing risks that can come with attending a big game. This fall, fans at a Seahawks game broke a world record for loudest stadium crowd with a “skill-splitting” 136.6 decibels, well into the rang where serious hearing damage or even ear drum ruptures can occur. Shortly thereafter, Kansas City Chief fans sounded in at an even higher 137.5 decibels for a new Guinness World Record.

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Wed, 12/04/2013 - 16:05

A recent article in The Atlantic spotlights a new blog that seeks to redefine how people think about technologies. As the article points out, we can do very little on our own. We cannot drink soup without a bowl or write without a pen. Yet, devices and technologies that help us in everyday life sometimes carry negative connotations. For instance, glasses are seen as fashion accessories, while hearing aids are seen as “assistive technologies”, much like wheelchairs are. Abler, a new channel on the Gizmodo blog, aims to re-categorize “assistive technology” as simply “technology”.

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